C.S. Lewis

Mar15

The Screwtape Letters, the provocative and wickedly funny theatrical adaptation of C.S. Lewis’ novel about spiritual warfare from a demon’s point of view, returns to Colorado Springs at Pikes Peak Center for the Performing Arts on Sunday, March 15, at 3 p.m.

 

The Screwtape Letters creates a topsy-turvy, morally-inverted universe set in an eerily stylish office in hell, where God is the “Enemy” and the devil is “Our Father below.” The play follows His Abysmal Sublimity Screwtape, Satan’s senior tempter, and his slavish creature-demon Toadpipe, as they train an apprentice demon on how to ruin the life and damn the soul of an unsuspecting human on earth.

 

 

Brent Harris returns to the role of Screwtape, which he has performed to sold-out audiences in New York City and across the U.S.

 

Tickets for The Screwtape Letters will go on sale on Friday, November 8 at 10 a.m. They start at $49 in price, plus applicable fees, and can be purchased at the Pikes Peak Center and The Broadmoor World Arena box offices and online at PikesPeakCenter.com, BroadmoorWorldArena.com and AXS.com. For students or individuals under 30 years of age, tickets are only $33 plus applicable fees when presenting a valid I.D. at the box offices only.

 

The Screwtape Letters has been seen by more than 500,000 people across the country and in London.The New York Times called The Screwtape Letters, “Clever and satirical . . . humorous and lively.” The New Yorker found it a “Fine, funny, thoughtful production.” The Associated Press said it is “Devilishly funny!” The Boston Globe called it, “Engrossing and entertaining!” and The Chicago Tribune said The Screwtape Letters is “Very smart...richly rewarding...with exuberant theatricality!” 

 

Along with The Chronicles of Narnia (including The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe), The Great Divorce and Mere Christianity, The Screwtape Letters remains one of Lewis’ most popular and influential works. The book's piercing insight into human nature and the lucid and humorous way Lewis makes his readers squirm in self-recognition made it an immediate success. When first published in 1942, it brought worldwide fame to the Oxford don, including the cover of Time Magazine.

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Performance Schedule
  • Sunday, March 15, 2020 at 3:00 PM CAL